Beware of White Saviors with ‘Black Lives Matter’ Signs

Emmy-winning actress Julianna Margulies has taken White liberalism to another new low.

Jeremy Helligar
Momentum
Published in
6 min readDec 3, 2023

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Photo: flickr/Ted Eytan

“I’m the first person to march in Black Lives Matter. When that happened to George Floyd, I put a black screen on my Instagram. I ran to support my Black brothers and sisters. When LGBTQ people are being attacked, I run. I made a commercial for same-sex marriage with my husband in 2012. I’m the first person to jump up when something is wrong, as I think most Jews are, because we have been persecuted from the beginning of time — not just World War II, but literally from the beginning of time when we first lived in Israel way before anybody else.” — Julianna Margulies

With an “ally” like this, who needs enemies?

In her November 21 appearance on Andy Ostroy’s “The Back Room” podcast, Emmy-winning actress Julianna Margulies’s White-savior liberalism went off the rails and crashed spectacularly, leaving skid marks on the backs of Black and LGBTQ people.

So this is how the world looks from underneath the bus.

Like Susan Sarandon three days before, Margulies was pissed off — but not over the genocide of Arabs in Gaza. What had her blood boiling? The plight of Jewish people everywhere and what she sees as global apathy toward antisemitism.

Margulies, who is Jewish but says she isn’t religious, spent close to 45 minutes railing at Hollywood for not doing enough to show support for Israel during the country’s current conflict with Hamas, at Black people for being “brainwashed to hate Jews,” and at the LGBTQ community (particularly, its younger, student branch) for caring more about pronouns than they do about the persecution of Jewish people.

She sounded like her brain was going 100 miles per hour in heavy traffic, not even pausing to pay attention to the stop signs. The actress was so hot and flustered as she talked that she stumbled over George Floyd’s name, as if for a brief moment…

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Jeremy Helligar
Momentum

Brother Son Husband Friend Loner Minimalist World Traveler. Author of “Is It True What They Say About Black Men?” and “Storms in Africa” https://rb.gy/3mthoj