End Slave Plantation Weddings

Healing and repair can’t happen while we still disrespect Black people

Jeffrey Kass
Momentum
Published in
4 min readFeb 8, 2023

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screenshot of website from Desert Plantation advertising wedding venue, which is to take place on a former slave plantation
Image: Website screenshot

It’s been commonplace and even chic for white people in the South to have their weddings on beautiful vast plantations. The scenery. The open air. The historical houses and barns. The charm.

If you Google “weddings on plantations in Mississippi,” you won’t get articles about what transpired there. Instead, you’ll get endless promotions of how wonderful it would be to book your wedding.

Brandon Hall Plantation. The Belmont 1857. Desert Plantation. Beauvoir.

Just to name several.

Named one of the “finest antebellum houses in the deep south,” Brandon Hall Plantation is advertised as a secluded historic estate set over rolling hills. It’s been called “picture perfect.” “Unparalleled.”

This plantation proudly invites would-be wedding guests to “take a step back in time and experience firsthand life in the 1800’s [sic].”

Image: Website screenshot

The good ol’ 1800s.

The Belmont advertises to would-be wedding planners its “rare antebellum architecture,” “hand-fired bricks,” “the finest decorative plaster” and “crowned molded chimneys.” The house was built by the plantation owners, the Worthington brothers, sometime between 1855 and 1861.

River Travel Magazine boasts that The Belmont is the BEST hidden gem of the Mississippi River.

Desert Plantation is advertised as a bed and breakfast and “the perfect destination for the Southern plantation of your dreams” among “ancient oak trees.”

All quite romantic, right? Like out of a romance film.

Except one little detail that gets lost in it all.

These plantations were the same places Black brothers and sisters were enslaved, beaten, raped, tortured and overworked. Some of these wedding venues and “hidden gems” still today celebrate the legacy of the Confederacy.

These weren’t the “plantations of your dreams” for enslaved Black people. Nightmares would be…

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Jeffrey Kass
Momentum

A Medium Top Writer on Racism, Diversity, Education, History and Parenting | Speaker | Award-Winning Author | Latest Book: Black Batwoman V. White Jesus | Dad