RACISM

White Christian Nationalists Are Today’s Ku Klux Klanners

If you put hoods on white Christian nationalists, they look and sound just like the Ku Klux Klan

Arturo Dominguez
Momentum
Published in
9 min readMar 28, 2024

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Ku Klux Klan members and a burning cross, Denver, Colorado, 1921 | Courtesy of Denver Library Digital Collections | Public Domain

[CONTENT WARNING: RACISM, HATE SPEECH]

Whether you consider yourself a white Christian nationalist or not, you may want to strap in because you’re about to have your eyes opened to a grim reality.

Many have discussed Project 2025–a project to force the country into more conservative ideals. The panic, however, seems to overlook that this plan was created and developed by Heritage Foundation founders in the early 1980s and gets updated every four years. Many also don’t know that former President Donald Trump enacted much of the 2016 version of the project while he was in office.

“The Reagan administration implemented nearly half of the ideas included in the first edition by the end of his first year in office, while the Trump administration embraced nearly 64% of the 2016 edition’s policy solutions after one year.”–Heritage Foundation ‘Project 2025 Mandate for Leadership’ (2023)

That’s not to say you shouldn’t be concerned about it. The current version of the project began in 2022 and has enlisted many other far-right groups that have racist and bigoted views. Charlie Kirk’s Turning Point USA and former Trump Senior Advisor Stephen Miller’s America First Legal are among the biggest names joining the Heritage Foundation’s current project. These partnerships give them an advantage in messaging.

However, you should know that far-right conservatives have been at this Klan(ish) ‘Mandate for Leadership’ white Christian nationalism for decades. None of this is new, as many likely know. But it is arguably more popular than ever thanks in large part to amplification by influencers with large followings on social media. This has led to the normalization of bigotry by some of the richest people in the US, who oftentimes own or control platforms.

Let’s face it, white Christian nationalism is what whiteness in the U.S. is largely based on and the root of nearly all hateful white supremacist ideologies. In the U.S., the ideas date back to its very beginning. Many of the so-called ‘founders’ were…

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Arturo Dominguez
Momentum

Journalist covering Congress, Racial Justice, Human Rights, Cuba, Texas | Editor: The Antagonist Magazine |